Open Access Short communication

Performances of Rabbit Fed Diets with Graded Levels of Bean Offal (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

Mube Kuietche Hervé, Ngoula Ferdinand, Fouepe Linda Blaise, Teguia Alexis

Asian Journal of Research in Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Page 1-7

Aims: The aim of the study was to increase rabbit production by evaluating the effects of bean offal on the growth performance of the New Zealand rabbits breed and to reduce the economic costs of feed.

Study Design: Study was conducted in a completely randomized design.

Methodology: For this purpose, forty-eight (48) rabbits of 50 days old were divided into four equal groups each containing 12 rabbits and into sub-groups of 3 rabbits per cage, depending on the rate of incorporation of bean offal (0, 15, 22.5, and 30% respectively for T0, T15, T22.5 and T30) in a completely randomized design. The diets were iso caloric and iso nitrogenous.

Results: The results obtained showed that there was no significance (p> 0.05) different among treatment means in final live weight, weekly live weight and feed conversion ratio (FCR), however, feed intake was significantly higher in the control diet T0 (3251±554.96 g) as compared to T22.5 (31412±554.96 g). Weight gain of rabbit fed dietT22.5 was higher (3173±284.93 g) as compared to those fed on control diet T0 that recorded the lowest values (2986.67±284.93 g). Cost of production per kg of live weight was significantly higher (p<0.05) with rabbit fed on control diet T0 (7835.79±278.62 FCFA) whereas the lowest value was recorded with rabbit under diet T30 (7232.06±278.62 FCFA).

Conclusion: It is concluded that up to 22% of bean offal could be included in rabbit diet to reduce cost of feed and improve performances.

Open Access Original Research Article

Chemical and Minerals Composition of Dried Ruminal Fluid with Spray Drying Method with Various Hydrocolloids

Fariba Rezai-Sarteshnizi, Hossein Abdi-Benemar, Jamal Seifdavati

Asian Journal of Research in Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Page 1-6

This study was conducted to determine the chemical and minerals composition of dried ruminal fluid with spray drying method with various hydrocolloids. Rumen contents were taken from the slaughterhouse and powdered by spray drying with different hydrocolloids including sodium alginate (RA), guar gum (RG), chitosan (RC) and maltodextrin (RM) in two ratios (0.5 and 1% (w/v)). Samples were analyzed with a completely randomized design. The results of mean percentages showed the samples contained moisture (617 ± 0.60 to 7.29 ± 0.03%), crude protein (9.96 ± 0.06 to 13.02 ± 0.04%), ether extract (1.82 ± 0.11 to 3.43 ± 0.13%), Ash (16.25 ± 0.21 to 22.67 ± 0.15%), NDF (24.18 ± 0.12 to 27.90 ± 0.10%), and carbohydrates (36.84 ± 0.05 to 44.54 ± 0.56%). The minerals were sodium (1.98 ± 0.12 to 4.02 ± 0.17%), potassium (0.46 ± 0.07 to 0.76 ± 0.10%), magnesium (0.69 ± 0.05 to 1.02 ± 0.07%), calcium (0.33 ± 0.02 to 0.70±0.05%) and phosphorous (1.22 ± 0.07 to 1.87± 0.01%). The results indicated that dried ruminal fluid with spray drying method with various hydrocolloids has nutrition values that could provide nutrients and minerals for livestock. It is recommended in the diet of animals.

Open Access Original Research Article

Coprological, Abattoir Survey and Economic Significance of Bovine Fascioliasis at Sylhet Region of Bangladesh

Selina Akhter, Tamanna Jahan Chowdhury, Md. Bashir Uddin, Md. Mahfujur Rahman, Md. Mukter Hossain

Asian Journal of Research in Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Page 1-7

This study was conducted in the Sylhet division of Bangladesh with the aim of determining the prevalence of fascioliasis in cattle of different age groups, sex and in seasons as well as to assess risk factors and economic loss caused by this parasite. In this study, faeces and livers of male and female animals were collected randomly from different farms and slaughterhouse respectively during a period of one year (September 2016 to August 2017). Coprological examinations were performed by standard sedimentation technique and liver samples were examined by slicing the collected livers. A total of 613 faeces and 215 livers were examined of which 119 (19.41%) and 52(24.18%) were found to contain Fasciola gigantica respectively. Fasciola in feces and liver samples were observed significantly (P=0.002 and 0.018) higher in older animals of above 5 years estimating 25.64% and 36.36%, respectively. The lowest prevalence of feces samples was found in cattle of >3years of age (10.27%) and the animals aged between 3-5years (20.00%) in case of the liver sample. The prevalence was higher in females contributing 19.42% in feces and 26.66% liver samples. Among three seasons, the infection was found to be more during rainy season 23.66% and 33.03% in faeces and liver sample respectively. The present study indicates that fasciola infection in cattle associated with the age and sex of the animals; and seasons of the year. To control the disease in this area, appropriate preventive control strategies have to be designed to reduce the impact of the disease on livestock production in Bangladesh.   

Open Access Original Research Article

Protein Fractions of Some Plant and Animal Protein Sources Using CNCPS Method

Elnaz Ghaffari Chanzanagh, Jamal Seifdavati, Farzad Mirzaei Aghjeh Gheshlagh, Hosein Abdibenemar, Reza Seyedsharifi

Asian Journal of Research in Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Page 1-6

Aims: This experiment was conducted with the aim of investigating fractions of protein of some plant and animal protein sources using the CNCPS method. 

Study Design:  After preparing the desired feed items, the protein fractions of feed samples were determined.

Methodology: This experiment was conducted on sources of plant protein (soybean meal, rapeseed meal, and cottonseed meal) and sources of animal protein (poultry offal meal, fish meal and blood meal).The protein fractions of feed samples were determined by Licitra et al, 1996. These fractions were included non-protein nitrogen, true protein, soluble true protein, insoluble protein, soluble protein in neutral detergent, insoluble protein in neutral detergent but soluble in acid detergent and insoluble in acid detergent and attached.

Results: After testing, the amount of non-protein nitrogen (fraction A) in soybean meal, cottonseed meal and rapeseed meal was 8.52, 6.33 and 4.55%, and in poultry offal meal, fish meal and blood meal in slaughterhouses were 10.38, 13.63 and 16.08% of crude protein, the amount of B1 in soybean meal, cottonseed meal and rapeseed meal was 2.30, 3.32 and 13.68% respectively, and in poultry offal meal, fish meal and blood meal, in slaughterhouses were 3.45, 7.44 and 7.16% of crude protein respectively , the amount of B2 in soybean meal, cottonseed meal and rapeseed meal was 80.49, 77.50 and 68.40%, in poultry offal meal, fish meal and blood meal, respectively, 66.36, 55.03 and 61.66% respectively, the amount of B3 for soybean meal, cottonseed meal and rapeseed meal was 6.24, 2.63 and 9.11%, respectively, and poultry offal meal, fish meal and blood meal in slaughterhouses were 7.50, 6.74 and 11.91% of crude protein respectively , the protein C portion assumed in the rumen's indissoluble CNCPS system in soybean meal, cottonseed meal, and rapeseed meal was 2.45, 9.92, and 4.77%, respectively, in poultry offal meal, fish meal and blood meal, respectively, 12.21 , 17.16 and 3.18% of crude protein.

Conclusion: The results indicate that the use of CNCPS and NRC data for portion fractions of different feeds cannot be considered absolutely, and domestic research and results should be used to extract samples from different regions and different growth conditions, so that the dietary regimens With these foods, it's real and more balanced and with less waste of nutrients.

Open Access Review Article

Livestock Development for Sustainable Livelihood of Small Farmers

Narayan G. Hegde

Asian Journal of Research in Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Page 1-17

Livestock is significantly contributing to livelihood and food security of more than a billion people in different parts of the world. However, the performance has been poor in many developing countries, due to various reasons. This paper reviews the distribution of different species of large and small ruminants and their status of production in different countries. The Indian experiences of improving cattle and goat husbandry to generate sustainable livelihood, has been very successful in empowering the poor, which has also been presented. Significant factors which have contributed to the success were genetic improvement, promotion of suitable technologies, development of infrastructure to strengthen the value chain and mentoring of small livestock owners to address their technical and business related problems. This review on status of livestock in different countries, demand for various products of livestock origin and impact of various interventions on performance will help to set priority for investment on development of different species.